THE GOAL

Our mission is to change the future of athletes from all around the world through knowledge and technology. We believe this mission is important because becoming a professional athlete is one of the most elite professions in the world.

THE CHALLENGE

The NCAA reports that 10.5% of baseball players will go from college to pro, followed by 4.1% of collegiate ice hockey players, and 2% of collegiate football players. At 1.9%, men’s soccer and women’s basketball at 1% make up the population of players who are least likely to play at a professional level after college.

10.5%

OF BASEBALL PLAYERS

4.8%

OF ICE HOCKEY PLAYERS

3%

OF FOOTBALL PLAYERS

1.9%

OF MEN'S SOCCER PLAYERS

1.9%

OF WOMEN'S BASKETBALL PLAYERS

Source: 14 Surprising Facts About Being a College Athlete

But professional athletes overcome incredible odds to do what they do.

During the last Olympic games, a whopping 150 athletes used GoFundMe or other crowdfunding platforms to fund their expenses associated with the games.  Source: Observer, US Fencer’s GoFundMe Highlights Pay Disparity Amongst Olympic Athletes. There is tremendous disparity when it comes to athletes’ incomes across gender and the type of sport.

In 2018, the top 100 highest-paid athletes earned $3.8 billion, a 23% jump over the previous year. However, there were zero female athletes on this list. In previous years, there has been at least one, and as many as three.

Source: The World’s 100 Highest-Paid Athletes 2018: Behind The Numbers

The top WNBA salary was $117,500 last season, compared to the top salary of $37.4 million in the NBA. The team salary cap for the National Pro Fastpitch softball league is $175,000; the Boston Red Sox will split $227 million amongst their entire roster in 2019.

Source: Why Female Athletes Earn Less Than Men Across Most Sports

One of the drivers of the current gender pay gap in sports is the disparity in sports sponsorship, and we think this is a huge opportunity.

Commercial investment and media coverage of women’s sport remains shockingly low, particularly in comparison to the deals done in men’s sport. Women’s sports sponsorships accounted for only 0.4% of total sports sponsorships between 2011 and 2013. Media coverage of women’s sports shows a similar level of disparity – women’s sports accounts for only 7% of total sports coverage.

Source: Women in Sport: Sponsorship and Media

Men’s sports make up 93% of off all sports media coverage


Women’s sports make up only 7%

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